Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Nature of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

v3.8.0.1
Nature of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2017
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation

Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements of the Company include the accounts of ETI, IP Resources International, Inc., Aviva Companies Corporation, and WeHealAnimals, Inc. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions are eliminated in consolidation.

Going Concern

Going Concern

 

These accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business for a period following the date of these consolidated financial statements. The Company has recurring net losses, negative cash flows from operations and working capital deficits. The Company has raised approximately $4.4 million in debt and equity financing for the year ended December 31, 2017. The Company is raising additional capital through debt and equity securities in order to continue the funding of its operations. However, there is no assurance that the Company can raise enough funds or generate sufficient revenues to pay its obligations as they become due, which raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. No adjustments have been made to the carrying value of assets or liabilities as a result of this uncertainty. To reduce the risk of not being able to continue as a going concern, management is commercializing its FDA cleared and CE marked products and has implemented its business plan to materialize revenues from potential, future, license agreements, has initiated a private placement offering to raise capital through the sale of its common stock and is seeking out profitable companies.

Use of Estimates

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Critical estimates include the value of shares issued for services, in connection with notes payable agreements, in connection with note extension agreements, and as repayment for outstanding debt, the useful lives of property and equipment, the valuation of the derivative liability, and the valuation of deferred income tax assets. Management uses its historical records and knowledge of its business in making these estimates. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Financial instruments that potentially subject us to a concentration of credit risk consist of cash and cash equivalents. Cash is deposited with what we believe are highly credited, quality institutions. The deposited cash may exceed Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) insured limits. At December 31, 2017, cash and cash equivalents did not exceed FDIC limits.

Property Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment

 

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which range between five and seven years. Repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred while improvements are capitalized. Upon the sale, retirement or disposal of fixed assets, the accounts are relieved of the cost and the related accumulated depreciation with any gain or loss recorded to the consolidated statements of operations.

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

Impairment of Long-lived Assets

 

The Company reviews its long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in business circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of assets may not be fully recoverable or that the useful lives of these assets are no longer appropriate. Each impairment test is based on a comparison of the undiscounted future cash flows generated from the asset group to the recorded value of the asset group. If impairment is indicated, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value.

Stock- Based Compensation

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company measures stock-based compensation cost at the grant date based on the fair value of the award and recognizes it as expense, net of estimated forfeitures, over the vesting or service period, as applicable, of the stock award using the straight-line method. When our common stock is thinly traded, we have made estimates of the fair value of the common stock based not only on market prices but other factors such as financial condition and results of operations.

 

The Company measured stock-based compensation using the Black-Scholes option valuation model using the following assumptions:

 

      December 31, 2017  
         
Expected term     2 - 5 years  
Exercise price     $0.0216 - $0.2669  
Expected volatility     184% - 217%  
Expected dividends     None  
Risk-free interest rate     1.50% - 1.87%  
Forfeitures     None  

Income Taxes

Income Taxes

 

The Company records a tax provision for the anticipated tax consequences of its reported results of operations. The provision for income taxes is computed using the asset and liability method, under which deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences of temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax bases of assets and liabilities, and for operating losses and income tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates that apply to taxable income in effect for the years in which those tax assets are expected to be realized or settled. The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized.

 

The Company has adopted ASC Topic 740, which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements. ASC Topic 740 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return, and also provides guidance on derecognition of tax benefits, classification on the balance sheet, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. The Company has determined that the adoption did not result in the recognition of any liability for unrecognized tax benefits and that there are no unrecognized tax benefits that would, if recognized, affect the Company’s effective tax rate.

Net Income (Loss) Per Share

Net Income (Loss) per Share

 

Basic net income (loss) per share is calculated based on the net income (loss) attributable to common shareholders divided by the weighted average number of shares outstanding for the period excluding any dilutive effects of options, warrants, unvested share awards and convertible securities. Diluted net income (loss) per common share assumes the conversion of all dilutive securities using the if-converted method and assumes the exercise or vesting of other dilutive securities, such as options, common shares issuable under convertible debt, warrants and restricted stock using the treasury stock method when dilutive.

Research and Development

Research and Development

 

Costs relating to the development of new products are expensed as research and development as incurred in accordance with FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 730-10, Research and Development. Research and development costs amounted to $115,159 and $0 for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively, and are included in operating expenses in the consolidated statements of operations.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Accounting guidance on fair value measurements and disclosures defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring the fair value of assets and liabilities using a hierarchy system, and defines required disclosures. It clarifies that fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants in the market in which the reporting entity transacts business.

 

The Company’s balance sheet contains derivative liability that is recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. The three-level valuation hierarchy for disclosure of fair value is as follows:

 

Level 1: uses quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2: uses observable market-based inputs or unobservable inputs that are corroborated by market data.

 

Level 3: uses unobservable inputs that are not corroborated by market data.

 

The fair value of the Company’s recorded derivative liability is determined based on unobservable inputs that are not corroborated by market data, which require a Level 3 classification. A Black-Sholes option valuation model was used to determine the fair value. The Company records derivative liability on the condensed consolidated balance sheets at fair value with changes in fair value recorded in the condensed consolidated statements of operation.

 

The following table presents changes in the liabilities with significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016:

 

    Fair Value Measurements at December 31, 2017 Using  
    Quoted Prices in     Significant Other     Significant        
    Active Markets for     Observable     Unobservable        
    Identical Assets     Inputs     Inputs        
    (Level 1)     (Level 2)     (Level 3)     Total  
                                 
Derivative liability   $ -     $ -     $ 5,939,600     $ 5,939,600  
Total   $ -     $ -     $ 5,939,600     $ 5,939,600  

 

    Fair Value Measurements at December 31, 2016 Using  
    Quoted Prices in     Significant Other     Significant        
    Active Markets for     Observable     Unobservable        
    Identical Assets     Inputs     Inputs        
    (Level 1)     (Level 2)     (Level 3)     Total  
                                 
Derivative liability   $ -     $ -     $ 1,927,752     $ 1,927,752  
Total   $ -     $ -     $ 1,927,752     $ 1,927,752  

 

The following table presents changes in the liabilities with significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016:

 

    Liability  
Balance December 31, 2015   $ 3,973,542  
         
Increase in Derivative Liability resulting from Issuance of convertible debt     2,525,515  
Decrease in Derivative Liability resulting from Settlements by debt extinguishment     (1,718,013 )
Decrease in Derivative Liability resulting from Change in estimated fair value     (2,853,292 )
         
Balance December 31, 2016     1,927,752  
         
Increase in Derivative Liability resulting from Issuance of convertible debt     9,185,674  
Decrease in Derivative Liability resulting from Settlements by debt extinguishment     (8,156,369 )
Increase in Derivative Liability resulting from Change in estimated fair value     2,982,543  
         
Balance December 31, 2017   $ 5,939,600

Derivative Liability

Derivative Liability

 

The Company issued Variable Debentures during the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016, which contained variable conversion rates based on unknown future prices of the Company’s common stock. This resulted in a derivative liability. The Company measures the derivative liability using the Black-Scholes option valuation model using the following assumptions:

 

      For Year Ending December 31,  
      2017       2016  
                 
Expected term     1 year       1 year - 2 years  
Exercise price     $0.0063-$0.385       $0.0113-$0.81  
Expected volatility     163%-201%       176%-276%  
Expected dividends     None       None  
Risk-free interest rate     0.79%-1.76%       0.45%-1.06%  
Forfeitures     None       None  

 

The assumptions used in determining fair value represent management’s best estimates, but these estimates involve inherent uncertainties and the application of management’s judgment. As a result, if factors change, including changes in the market value of the Company’s common stock, managements’ assessment or significant fluctuations in the volatility of the trading market for the Company’s common stock, the Company’s fair value estimates could be materially different in the future.

 

The Company computes the fair value of the derivative liability at each reporting period and the change in the fair value is recorded as non-cash expense or non-cash income. The key component in the value of the derivative liability is the Company’s stock price, which is subject to significant fluctuation and is not under its control, and the assessment of volatility. The resulting effect on net loss is therefore subject to significant fluctuation and will continue to be so until the Company’s Variable Debentures, which the convertible feature is associated with, are converted into common stock or paid in full with cash. Assuming all other fair value inputs remain constant, the Company will record non-cash expense when its stock price increases and non-cash income when its stock price decreases.

Preferred Stock

Preferred Stock

 

The Company elects to accrete the difference between the redemption value and carrying value of outstanding preferred stock over the period from the date of issuance to the earliest redemption date using the effective interest method.

Recent Accounting Standard Updates

Recent Accounting Standard Updates

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which supersedes existing guidance on accounting for leases in “Leases (Topic 840)” and generally requires all leases to be recognized in the consolidated balance sheet. ASU 2016-02 is effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018; early adoption is permitted. The provisions of ASU 2016-02 are to be applied using a modified retrospective approach. The Company does not expect the adoption of this standard to significantly impact its consolidated financial statements.

 

In 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (“ASU 2016-15”), which provides clarification regarding how certain cash receipts and cash payments are presented and classified in the statement of cash flows and ASU 2016-18, Restricted Cash (“ASU 2016-18”), which requires an entity to show the changes in total cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents in the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-15 and ASU 2016-18 are effective for us beginning January 1, 2017 and was applied by us using a retrospective transition method. Adoption of these standards did not have an impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

In 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-16, Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory (“ASU 2016-16”), which requires a company to recognize the tax consequences of an intra-entity transfer of an asset, other than inventory, when the transfer occurs. ASU 2016-16 is effective for us beginning January 1, 2017 and was applied by us using a modified retrospective method. Adoption of this standard did not have an impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

On January 1, 2017, we adopted ASU 2016-09, Compensation - Stock Compensation (“ASU 2016-09”) which simplifies several aspects of the accounting for employee share-based payment transactions, including the accounting for forfeitures and statutory tax withholding requirements, as well as classification in the statement of cash flows. Adoption of ASU 2016-09 did not have a significant impact on our Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, Business Combinations (“ASU 2017-01”) which provided new guidance clarifying the definition of a business for determining whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. The new standard is effective for annual periods, and interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2017 with early adoption permitted for transactions that occurred before the issuance date or effective date of the standard if the transactions were not reported in financial statements that have been issued or made available for issuance. Upon early adoption, the standard did not impact how we assess acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) that simplifies the test for goodwill impairment by eliminating step two from the goodwill impairment test. Under the new guidance, an entity should recognize an impairment charge for the amount based on the excess of a reporting unit’s carrying amount over its fair value. The impairment charge will be limited to the amount of goodwill allocated to that reporting unit. For public companies, the guidance is effective for annual and interim impairment tests performed in periods beginning after December 15, 2019 on a prospective basis, and earlier adoption is permitted for goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. We early adopted this guidance during 2017, and the adoption did not impact our financial statements.